Recovery From Borderline Personality Disorder

Closeup of the eyes of a happy young woman smiling at the camera

The Controversy and The Reality about Recovery from Borderline Personality Disorder

There is controversy about recovery from Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). This controversy stems from the complicated nature of BPD, the focus on the criteria for diagnosis, focus on medication and the notion that BPD is “all biological” and the neglect or failure on the part of professionals in terms of actually mapping out what the process of recovery from BPD is and what recovery from BPD can be defined as – how it can be measured.

As far as I know there has not, as of yet, anyway, been any professional who has actually come out and said here’s what you need to do to recover from BPD – or here is what recovery looks like. Some believe that merely not having 5 out of the 9 traits listed in the DSM-IV means one is no longer borderline. I don’t think recovery is that simple. I think there are stages to recovery. In the process of recovery, eliminating the number of traits that define BPD means that one is getting better, one is actively in recovery. There is also the idea out there that if you were suicidal and you aren’t anymore, or if you self harmed and you don’t anymore that equals recovery. Again, I would say, based on my own experience that these are stages of getting better on the road to recovery.

To date professionals seem content with the focus that is placed mainly in the following three areas:

  1. The criteria for diagnosis
  2. The medication needed or hoped for (future medications) to treat BPD according to symptom manifestation.
  3. The best and most effective ways to treat BPD

What’s wrong with this?

To begin with focusing only on the criteria for diagnosis defines the problem without offering the hope for its solution. The focus on medication now available or medication that many (not all) professionals like to claim will “someday” be the “cure-all” for BPD to treat symptoms as they present or manifest themselves does little, if anything, really, toward addressing what really needs to be addressed jointly by professionals and by those who have BPD in order for recovery to be possible.

Pages: << First | 1 | 2 | 3 | ... | Next > | Last >> | Single Page

A.J. Mahari lives in Ontario, Canada. She is an Author, Speaker, Counselor, Life Coach, BPD/Loved Ones Coach, NPD/Loved Ones Coach, Mental Health Coach, and Self-Improvement Coach. She has been described by many as an insightful and astute student of life’s ups and downs. A.J. is a Mental Health Professional. A.J. writes from her own life experience and education. You can purchase any of A.J.'s 35+ Ebooks or Written and Narrated 45+ Audio Programs or work with her as a your Counselor or Life Coach. She is a sexual abuse survivor and recovered from Borderline Personality Disorder many years ago. She is also an adult living with (“high functioning”) Asperger's Syndrome.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Login

Lost your password?