ADHD: Understanding the Problem

09_0087_Layer 14

Mark

Mark, age 14, has more energy than most boys his age. But then, he’s always been overly active. Starting at age 3, he was a human tornado, dashing around and disrupting everything in his path. At home, he darted from one activity to the next, leaving a trail of toys behind him. At meals, he upset dishes and chattered nonstop. He was reckless and impulsive, running into the street with oncoming cars, no matter how many times his mother explained the danger or scolded him. On the playground, he seemed no wilder than the other kids. But his tendency to overreact–like socking playmates simply for bumping into him–had already gotten him into trouble several times. His parents didn’t know what to do. Mark’s doting grandparents reassured them, “Boys will be boys. Don’t worry, he’ll grow out of it.” But he didn’t.

Lisa

At age 17, Lisa still struggles to pay attention and act appropriately. But this has always been hard for her. She still gets embarrassed thinking about that night her parents took her to a restaurant to celebrate her 10th birthday. She had gotten so distracted by the waitress’ bright red hair that her father called her name three times before she remembered to order. Then before she could stop herself, she blurted, “Your hair dye looks awful!”

In elementary and junior high school, Lisa was quiet and cooperative but often seemed to be daydreaming. She was smart, yet couldn’t improve her grades no matter how hard she tried. Several times, she failed exams. Even though she knew most of the answers, she couldn’t keep her mind on the test. Her parents responded to her low grades by taking away privileges and scolding, “You’re just lazy. You could get better grades if you only tried.” One day, after Lisa had failed yet another exam, the teacher found her sobbing, “What’s wrong with me?”

Henry

Although he loves puttering around in his shop, for years Henry has had dozens of unfinished carpentry projects and ideas for new ones he knew he would never complete. His garage was piled so high with wood, he and his wife joked about holding a fire sale.

Every day Henry faced the real frustration of not being able to concentrate long enough to complete a task. He was fired from his job as stock clerk because he lost inventory and carelessly filled out forms. Over the years, afraid that he might be losing his mind, he had seen psychotherapists and tried several medications, but none ever helped him concentrate. He saw the same lack of focus in his young son and worried.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *